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▣ Maryland man pleads guilty in no-body murder case

posted by Admin on October 10th, 2016 at 2:56 PM

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In desperate search for missing Cecil County teens, authorities make a deal with a killer

In 2014, two teens vanished from the same neighborhood in Elkton, Maryland. The suspect accused of their murder, cuts a deal a day before his trial. (Baltimore Sun video)
Justin Fenton
With two teens missing, Cecil Co. authorities make a deal with their suspected killer. Would it bring closure?

The cop and the prosecutor were working together that day, preparing for a murder trial, when the phone buzzed.

It was August 2015, and in just a few days, Donald Ray Bennett was to stand trial for the killings of two teenagers whose disappearances a year earlier had gripped this northeastern Maryland town. Despite the crush of attention, the involvement of the FBI and hundreds of hours performing searches by land, air and water, the boys had never been found.

On the other side of the phone was Bennett’s defense attorney, with an offer. Bennett was willing to plead guilty to both murders and serve 30 years. It was a light sentence for the cruel crimes, but Bennett had a powerful bargaining chip: He knew where the bodies were. The catch was that a year had gone by, and he couldn’t be certain they were still there.

For the detective, Andy Tuer, and the prosecutor, Karl Fockler, it was an agonizing decision. They felt confident that the circumstantial evidence could convict Bennett in the deaths. And if found guilty at trial, Bennett would face a harsher penalty, as much as two life sentences.

For more: Baltimore Sun

Posted by Thomas A. (Tad) DiBiase, The No Body Guy
 

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